Inside the Most Expensive Home In the World

Tour the palatial estate in the South of France that’s on the market for $410 million.

photography by AMBROISE TEZENAS FOR BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK


Ever wonder how far $400 million (and then some) will get you? For a mind-blowing €350 million ($410 million), you can call the priciest home in the world yours.

 
When Villa Les Cèdres—the 187-year-old-mansion in the South of France named for its cedar-lined drive—graced the market in 2016, it won the title as the most expensive house on Earth. Sitting along the coast of Saint-Jean-Cap-Ferrat just outside Nice, the 35-acre property was built in 1830 and has hosted a number of ultra rich tenants, including King Leopold II of Belgium and the famous Marnier-Lapostolle family of the liqueur empire, Grand Marnier. While the home’s current seller, Italian distiller Davide Campari-Milano, only recently acquired the opulent address in 2016, the group is hoping that Villa Les Cèdres’ rich history, prime location, and impeccable grounds, are enough to justify the enormous homes’ extreme price tag.

photography by AMBROISE TEZENAS FOR BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK


Literally fit for royalty, the 18,000-square-foot abode boasts 14 bedrooms, an Olympic-sized swimming pool, detailed coffered ceilings, and silk-clad walls. While some may find the home’s interiors extravagant or old-fashioned, the furnishings offer a unique peek into the past.

photography by AMBROISE TEZENAS FOR BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK


On the ground floor, a 12-foot tall stone fireplace champions the main living space.

photography by AMBROISE TEZENAS FOR BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK


A true bibliophile’s haven, the wood-paneled library holds 3,000 books on flora and naturalism.

photography by AMBROISE TEZENAS FOR BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK


Outside, potential buyers will discover panoramic views of Villefranche-sur-Mer and the town below, as well as the Alps.

But just like with buying any new home, it’s crucial to scope out the area—because who wants nosey (or noisy) neighbors? Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen and English composer Andrew Lloyd Webber are just two A-listers who own villas around the corner.

photography by AMBROISE TEZENAS FOR BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK


Perhaps one of the most unique features of the luxe abode is its gardens. Approximately 14,000 plant species are scattered throughout the home’s 25 whimsical greenhouses, in addition to the open gardens. According to Bloomberg Businessweek, Villa Les Cèdres’ grounds are considered among the top 10 botanical gardens in the world—giving towns and universities around the globe a run for their money.

Other dreamy botanical features include the larger-than-life Amazonian lily pads that fill the man-made pond outside.

photography by AMBROISE TEZENAS FOR BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK


Published on October 16, 2017 - 3:35pm EDT

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