How to Juice a Pomegranate (Without a Juicer)

It's easier than you think.

photography by AARON BENGOCHEA


As we near the tail-end of pomegranate season, we're looking to fresh and creative ways to indulge in the fruit. Loaded with antioxidants, vitamins, and Potassium, the pomegranate's immune-boosting qualities earmark it as an essential for the cold winter months, especially when those sick days come at aplenty. 
 
You've likely had it in either the form of juice or a heaping bowl of seeds. And while the former of the two may be the less popular—with the flavor often being tart and thick, not to mention, loaded with sugar to balance out the two—there is a healthier alternative you've likely never tried. Yep, we're talking about homemade juice, sans the sugar and preservatives that often come with the store-bought version. And even better? You can easily make it yourself, without the help of a juicer or blender. Here's how.

photography by AARON BENGOCHEA


Choosing a ripe pomegranate is of the essence, otherwise the juice will be significantly more tart. The skin color is usually a tell-tale sign of the quality of the seeds inside—the darker and the redder the outside, the better. Avoid pomegranates with yellow or brown spots, it's likely that the inner seeds will be spoilt. 

 
To juice the pomegranate, all you'll need is a sharp knife and a glass. Before you begin, examine the pomegranate to make sure there are no tears or holes in the skin—this will cause the pomegranate to explode when you're attempting to juice it. Start out by setting the pomegranate on a clean surface, with the stem and end facing out, and gently press down on its side using your palms. You'll feel the subtle crunch of the seeds inside, this is where the action happens!

photography by AARON BENGOCHEA


Slowly rotate the pomegranate as you press down, working in a circular motion to ensure that you're reaching the majority of the seeds inside. Make certain that you're not focusing on one section over another, and avoid putting a significant amount of pressure on one spot to prevent it from bursting. 

photography by AARON BENGOCHEA


Once you have thoroughly squeezed the pomegranate, you'll notice the significant difference in its level of firmness—and as soon as it is relatively soft to the touch, it will be ready to juice. 

photography by AARON BENGOCHEA


Here is where things get tricky. Feel free to work over a large bowl in lieu of the cup, to ensure that you don't lose the juice or make a mess on the counter.

Using a sharp-tipped knife, make a shallow incision within the grove of the pomegranate. As you prepare to do so, position the hole directly above the glass or bowl, as once it's sliced, the juice will immediately flow out. 

photography by AARON BENGOCHEA


Avoid squeezing the pomegranate too hard, as this may cause a rip in the skin and consequently, a massive spill. Gently continue squeezing the fruit over the glass, slowly rotating it to avoid putting too much pressure on one specific part. 

After you have completely exhausted the pomegranate, use a strainer to remove the seeds from the glass, as it's likely a few will fall in. Once done, the juice is ready to drink!

photography by AARON BENGOCHEA


If you find the flavor to be too tart—a result of the pomegranate being of poor quality or not ripe enough—add touch of sweetener to dilute the taste. An added bonus? The fresh juice also makes for quite the delicious mixer for winter cocktails.

And if you find that you still prefer the pomegranate in seed form, here's how to deseed one like a pro. 

Published on January 10, 2018 - 1:11pm EST

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