The 5 Best Low-Maintenance Plants to Put in Your Bathroom

An added bonus? They’ll improve your mood, too.

 Bathroom plants

photography by Molly Winters


Indoor plants can not only transform a room’s aesthetic, they’ve also been known to boost mood, increase creativity, decrease stress and anxiety, and naturally filter indoor air toxins. But while these are all great reasons to invest in plants for your home, where should you place them? It turns out, one of the most underrated places to keep plants is in the bathroom.

There are a number of houseplants that thrive in the warm, humid conditions a bathroom provides. A bathroom can mimic some plants’ native tropical habitat—so if you're a houseplant novice, a bathroom environment can seriously help to keep your first plant thriving.

Plus, a new plant is one of the more simple ways to update a bathroom and give it a spa-like feel—try hanging a plant off the shower curtain rod, or place a potted plant next to the bathroom sink.

However, the most important thing to consider when shopping for a bathroom plant is how much natural light your bathroom actually receives.

We shared our top five picks—in order of their light requirements—on the new few slides.

 Bathroom plants snake plant

photography by THE SILL


1. Snake Plant

The snake plant is almost indestructible—not only can it tolerate both very low light and complete neglect, but it also naturally filters toxins like formaldehyde, benzene, trichloroethylene, xylene, and toluene from indoor air.

Care: Moderate to low, indirect light, but can tolerate bright, semi-direct light. Water about twice a month. Drought-tolerant/succulent.

Shop snake plates and learn more on The Sill.

 Bathroom plants pothos

photography by THE SILL


2. Pothos

Nicknamed the “cubicle plant” because of how tolerant it is of low light and irregular watering, the pothos is a hardy pick for any space. As a trailing plant, it’s perfect for hanging off of your shower curtain rod.

Care: Moderate to low, indirect light. Water about every 10 to 14 days, but be sure to increase watering with increased light and temperature.

Shop pothos and learn more on The Sill.

 Bathroom plants bird's nest fern

photography by THE SILL


3. Bird’s Nest Fern

There’s a wide variety of ferns to choose from, but one of our favorites is the bird’s nest fern—its large, wavy, and bright green fronds create instant jungle vibes. Since it thrives in high humidity, it’s perfect for the bathroom.

Care: Moderate to low, indirect light. Water once a week. Increase its humidity by either misting it every few days, or keeping it right by the shower.

Shop bird's nest ferns and learn more on The Sill.

 Bathroom air plant

photography by THE SILL


4. Air Plant

Not all plants need soil—instead of using roots to absorb water and nutrients, air plants use their specialized leaves to absorb both from the air. They can tolerate a range of conditions, but are happiest in spots with bright, indirect light, and high humidity.

Care: Bright to moderate, indirect light, but can tolerate a few hours of direct light. Submerge in water once a week for about 10 minutes, and increase humidity by misting it every few days.

Shop air plants and learn more on The Sill.

 Bathroom plants aloe

photography by THE SILL


5. Aloe

Aloe’s a structural beauty, but it also has added benefits: Its gooey insides can be used to help sooth skin, heal minor burns, reduce itch, and so much more. It also naturally filters the toxins benzene and formaldehyde from indoor air.

Care: Bright, indirect to semi-direct light. Water about once a month. Drought-tolerant/succulent.

Shop aloe and learn more on The Sill.

 Bathroom plants sill

photography by THE SILL


Note: Remember that the watering recommendations are estimates—there is no exact formula or schedule for watering houseplants. Environmental factors, which can differ from home to home, as well as from season to season, can affect watering recommendations.

Below are our top two tips when it comes to watering.

1. It’s better to under water your plant than to over water it. You can always add more water, but subtracting it from potting soil is tricky.

2. Check in with your plant every couple of days. Feel its soil, and you’ll soon get to know the signals for when it’s thirsty.

The Sill is a garden shop based in New York City that specializes in indoor plants perfect for city apartments. At The Sill (or on their website), you can shop, learn, or work hand-in-hand with a dedicated Plant Specialist on a plant design and maintenance program.

See more original bathroom ideas:
These 5 Bathrooms Are Inspiring Major Home Envy
Bathroom Design Ideas That Are Definitely Off The Beaten Path
These Rustic Bathrooms Make A Case For Country Living

Published on August 01, 2017 - 5:30am EDT

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